Club Activities

The University Foundation organises a variety of activities for the members. For the academic of cultural Club activities the reader is referred to the French or Dutch sections of the Club activities.  

 - (Thursday, December 5, 2024 - 14:00)

The Ethical Forum 2024 of the University Foundation will be devoted to an exchange of views on the criteria for the appointment and the promotion of academic staff in the universities, with the title

TOWARDS A REVOLUTION IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMICS ? 

The Ethical Forum 2024 takes place on Thursday, December 5, 2024 from 2 to 6 pm, at the University Foundation.
For more information the reader is referred to the EF website.

 

 - (Monday, November 18, 2024 - 18:00)
In the series “Members have their say…” Professor Frederic Vermeulen (KU Leuven) comes to talk about his first historical novel "De heks van Gottem" (The witch of Gottem) (Publisher Lannoo, 2024); he enters into a dialogue with Professor Dick Harrison (Lund University, Sweden; author of over 105 books) whose book Heksenjacht (Witch hunt) was recently published. A story of fear, repression and misogyny (Omniboek, 2024).
 
In English.

The discussion is follwed by a reception, during which the book kn be bourht and dedicated.

Participation 25 € p.p. Inscription form.

The speakers

Frederic Vermeulen (1974) is full professor of economics at KU Leuven and winner of the Francqui Prize in 2019. In the search for his family history, he discovered his relationship with Tanneke Sconyncx, his great (x9) grandmother.

Dick Harrison (1966) is professor of history at Lund University, Sweden. He writes articles, blogs, novels and non-fiction books and makes TV documentaries about European and Swedish history.
 

The books

The witch of Gottem. The true story of Tanneke Sconyncx

Between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, thousands of women and men were wrongly accused of witchcraft. Tanneke Sconyncx was one of them. This is her story.

The Spanish Netherlands, late sixteenth century. These are tough times for the people of Gottem. The troops of Philip of Spain and the advancing Calvinist armies devoured the small towns and villages, religious disputes split the small village communities in two and the plague reared its ugly head. The emptying countryside and the collapsed flax industry are in malaise.

The headstrong, young Tanneke is on the threshold of a new life when she marries the wealthy farmer's son Thomas. But it is also becoming increasingly difficult for them to manage the family farm. And when a dismissed servant spreads the gossip that Tanneke is a witch, they really get into trouble.

In a world run by men, without any defense or protection from any higher authority, Tanneke tries to prove her innocence in a trial that seems to have already been conducted in advance.

Witch hunt. A history of fear, repression and misogyny

In 'Witch Hunt', the Swedish historian Dick Harrison describes the major witch trials and witchcraft persecutions in Europe since ancient times. He pays extra attention to the persecutions in Western Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries.

The image of 'the witch' had terrible consequences for countless innocent women. They were exiled, smeared, accused, abused, convicted and murdered. Sometimes because they were seen as strange or dangerous, often just because they were 'different' from established society. Understanding these events requires an understanding of the spirit of the times. Dick Harrison sheds light on the cultural and political circumstances that led to the belief and persecution of witches and witchcraft and explains how in all these cases many women proved to be the ideal scapegoat.

Harrison edited the original Swedish edition especially for Dutch-speaking readers with numerous examples from the Netherlands and Belgium.

 - (Monday, November 18, 2024 - 18:00)
In the series “Members have their say…” Professor Frederic Vermeulen (KU Leuven) comes to talk about his first historical novel "De heks van Gottem" (The witch of Gottem) (Publisher Lannoo, 2024); he enters into a dialogue with Professor Dick Harrison (Lund University, Sweden; author of over 105 books) whose book Heksenjacht (Witch hunt) was recently published. A story of fear, repression and misogyny (Omniboek, 2024).
 
In English.

The discussion is follwed by a reception, during which the book kn be bourht and dedicated.

Participation 25 € p.p. Inscription form.

The speakers

Frederic Vermeulen (1974) is full professor of economics at KU Leuven and winner of the Francqui Prize in 2019. In the search for his family history, he discovered his relationship with Tanneke Sconyncx, his great (x9) grandmother.

Dick Harrison (1966) is professor of history at Lund University, Sweden. He writes articles, blogs, novels and non-fiction books and makes TV documentaries about European and Swedish history.
 

The books

The witch of Gottem. The true story of Tanneke Sconyncx

Between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, thousands of women and men were wrongly accused of witchcraft. Tanneke Sconyncx was one of them. This is her story.

The Spanish Netherlands, late sixteenth century. These are tough times for the people of Gottem. The troops of Philip of Spain and the advancing Calvinist armies devoured the small towns and villages, religious disputes split the small village communities in two and the plague reared its ugly head. The emptying countryside and the collapsed flax industry are in malaise.

The headstrong, young Tanneke is on the threshold of a new life when she marries the wealthy farmer's son Thomas. But it is also becoming increasingly difficult for them to manage the family farm. And when a dismissed servant spreads the gossip that Tanneke is a witch, they really get into trouble.

In a world run by men, without any defense or protection from any higher authority, Tanneke tries to prove her innocence in a trial that seems to have already been conducted in advance.

Witch hunt. A history of fear, repression and misogyny

In 'Witch Hunt', the Swedish historian Dick Harrison describes the major witch trials and witchcraft persecutions in Europe since ancient times. He pays extra attention to the persecutions in Western Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries.

The image of 'the witch' had terrible consequences for countless innocent women. They were exiled, smeared, accused, abused, convicted and murdered. Sometimes because they were seen as strange or dangerous, often just because they were 'different' from established society. Understanding these events requires an understanding of the spirit of the times. Dick Harrison sheds light on the cultural and political circumstances that led to the belief and persecution of witches and witchcraft and explains how in all these cases many women proved to be the ideal scapegoat.

Harrison edited the original Swedish edition especially for Dutch-speaking readers with numerous examples from the Netherlands and Belgium.

 - (Wednesday, April 24, 2024 - 18:00)

On April 24, 2024, at 6 pm, the University Foundation, in collaboration with the Royal Military Academy and the Egmont Institute, will organize a debate (Dutch and Fraench) on the challenges for geostrategy and world order in the international election year 2024. The war that has been going on since 2022 in Ukraine presents us with very major geostrategic challenges. Elections will also be held in more than 50 countries in 2024, especially in Europe, the United States and Russia, and there will be a new leadership for NATO and for Europe. What are the main challenges our world must deal with? How do we deal with these challenges from a military point of view and from a political point of view? This very important issue is introduced from a military point of view by Lt-Col Tom Simoens , RMA, and Col (GS) Peter Philipsen, RMA, and from a politico-strategic point of view by Ambassador Ghislain D’hoop, FPS Foreign Affairs, with Prof. Dr Alexander Mattelaer, Egmont Institute, as moderator.

The debate will be followed by a reception.

Participation €25.

Registration form

The panel members

Lieutenant Colonel Tom Simoens is professor of history at the Royal Military Academy. He discusses the geopolitical challenges in a historical context and in a broader perspective since 1945 and discusses whether we are really dealing with a historical turning point.

Colonel Peter Philipsen, professor at the Royal Military Academy, situates the current challenges in a broader military context.

Ambassador Ghislain D'hoop is a senior diplomat who has held various leadership positions in his 40-year career (Foreign Affairs, Royal Counselor, Ambassador in Berlin, Chairman of the UN Commission on Drugs, Vice-Chairman of the IAEA Board) and is currently acting Director General for Multilateral Affairs and Globalisation at the Belgian Foreign Ministry.

Prof. Dr Alexander Mattelaer is a Senior Research Fellow at the Egmont Institute (Royal Institute for International Relations), professor at VUB and also affiliated with the Royal Higher Institute for Defense. He worked as a visiting researcher at Harvard University and the National Defense University in Washington DC.